First National Congress
6-7 December 2004, Cebu City, Philippines


Effectiveness of Computer-Simulated Experiments (CSE) in Teaching High School Physics
by Shirley P. Caday
Sarrat National High School, Sarrat, Ilocos Norte

The study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of computer-simulated experiments (CSE) in the teaching of Physics. More specifically, the study aimed to determine whether the use of CSE will bring about a better understanding of physics concepts and science processes, and a positive disposition toward science among students.

The study made use of the experimental-control design. Two groups of students were involved in this study. Group I (the experimental group) was taught using the CSE strategy while Group II (the control group) received the same laboratory exposure but using the conventional laboratory strategy.

Tests on Physics concepts and science processes and a Science Attitude Inventory were administered to the students as pretest and posttest. In addition, a CSE Attitude Questionnaire was administered to the experimental group to evaluate their reactions to the CSE strategy.

The t-test for Correlated Means was used to determine significant differences, if any, between the pretest and posttest mean scores of the groups along the following areas: (1) physics knowledge; (2) science processes; and (3) attitude developed toward physics.

The results of the analysis showed that students in both groups performed better in the posttest than in the pretest in the tests of science concepts and science processes. However, their attitudes toward science remained unaffected even after completing the different laboratory experiments on velocity, inertia, free fall, momentum, and Hooke's Law.

Students who were exposed to the CSE did not differ significantly from the students who were taught using the ordinary physics laboratory. This implies that the traditional laboratory method remains as an effective mode of instruction in Physics. However, the CSE can be utilized by teachers as an alternative strategy for teaching the subject.

 

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