Concurrent Paper Presentations
 

Concurrent Paper Presentations 1

 
  Reflections on ICTs in Basic Education Policy and Practice in the Philippines
  Building 21st Century Skills: What does it mean?
  A Journey Towards Building a 21st Century School: The San Isidro National High School experience
  The Integration of Technologies in the Classroom Program of Placido del Mundo Elementary School: Gateway to pupils’ learning success
  Schools Radio Broadcasting: 97.9 SJ FM La Salle Radio
  Distance Education for the Marginalized: Using communication technology as an alternative approach to adult literacy education
  21st Century Lifeskills for the Poor: The Sandiwaan experience
  Developing Localized ICT-enabled Content for e-Health: The Molave WASH experience
  Concurrent Paper Presentations 2
 
  Designing and Implementing an Effective Teacher Professional Development Program on ICT Integration: A framework for decision-making
  Developing a Technology-distributed Teacher Professional Development Program:
Framework, issues and challenges
  ICT and Teacher Training: Case studies from across the world
  Mindanao eLearning Space Quality Management System: An effective approach to eLearning
  The Pilot Intel® Teach to the Future Pedagogical Support System
  Techmentoring: The Partners in Learning way
  Using Radio to Deliver Instruction: UP NISMED’s Titser’s Iskul on the Air Program
  Soaring High: The ICT in education experience of MSU-IIT
  Concurrent Paper Presentations 3
  ICT Integration: A roadmap for Philippine educational institutions
  Information Fluency Continuum
  Online Learning and Intellectual Property Rights: An overview
  FOSS in Education Strategy
  GILAS: Connecting our youth to the World Wide Web
  Making Information Technology Safe for Children and Young People Wherever They Are
  Managing Your ICT Laboratory: Systems and procedures
  Involving Communities for Better Education: The case of Tayud, Consolacion
  Concurrent Paper Presentations 4
 
  “Broadbanding” Education - The Smart way
  Mobilizing Island Communities to Sustain Television-based Instruction: The Knowledge Channel experience in Mindanao
  Private Sector-Public Sector Partnerships on ICT-related Services: The STI On-the-Job Training Program
  Financing ICTs in Basic Education
  Surfing Under the Sun: A sustainable computer laboratory-Internet café at Cabilao National High School
  IBM eMentor Scholarship Program in Mindanao: Strategic partnerships for effective ICT use in education
  The Negros Oriental High School e-Learning Club: Organizing students in support of ICT–based innovations
  Students as Catalysts of ICT Integration: The Dynamic Mathematicians Group at the University of the East (Caloocan) High School
  Data-driven Information and Communication Technology Planning for Schools, Divisions, and Regions
  Project LIFTS – Harnessing ICT to Serve the Region
  Project Online ECIJANOS: Using digital imaging and video technology to enhance instruction, administration, and documentation
  Mobilizing Community Support for ICT-based Innovations
 

Reflections on ICTs in Basic Education Policy
and Practice in the Philippines

by Patricia B. Arinto
Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, University of the Philippines Open University

This paper contrasts two perspectives on information and communication technologies (ICTs) in education: the human capital perspective, which views ICTs as vital for global competitiveness, and the human development perspective, which views ICTs as a means for achieving broad-based and equitable development. It shows that while policy statements on ICTs in basic education in the Philippines seem to espouse a human development perspective, key ICTs for schools policy initiatives tend to be informed by a human capital approach. This paper then proposes some alternative policy directions for ICT integration in Philippine schools based on a human development framework.
   
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Building 21st Century Skills: What does it mean?
by George Scharffenberger
Executive Director, World Links

Basic education must first and foremost prepare its “graduates” for the world of citizenship, work and/or further studies that await them. In this regard, proponents of increased investment in information and communication technologies (ICTs) in basic education cite their unique value in developing “21st Century Skills” among the next generation. But more often than not, what is meant by 21st Century Skills is left undefined or at best ambiguous. If the potential value of ICTs in building such skills is to be realized, educators will need to be more explicit in the specific skills being targeted and the implications of those targets for how technology is used and the way that classroom instruction is organized. New approaches to assessment are also needed to measure relative success, motivate students and educators, and gain the support of parents.

Despite increasing globalization, there is still no universally applicable set of skills that corresponds to every country setting. This presentation, which is based on the experiences of World Links and the work of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, proposes a helpful framework that includes ICT Literacy (computer, software, and Internet skills), Learning and Thinking Skills (critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration, and communication), 21st Century Content (global awareness, financial/entrepreneurial literacy, and health and wellness awareness), and Life Skills (leadership, ethics, social responsibility, and accountability), in addition to traditional core subject content (language arts, math, science, history, civics, etc.).

Organizations such as World Links have been focusing on how ICTs can be tapped to maximize the full range of 21st Century Skills beyond simple ICT literacy. ICTs are being used to expand targeted, student-centered, project-based learning pedagogies that can be applied to every category of skill development. The challenge faced is how to bring such programs to scale so that these become a fulcrum for fundamental re-design of school for all students rather than remaining an enrichment activity for the few.
   
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A Journey Towards Building a 21st Century School:
The San Isidro National High School experience

by Divinelinda E. dela Cruz, Principal
and Eden Samadan, ICT Coordinator
San Isidro National High School, Schools Division of Makati City
National Capital Region, Department of Education


Rapid advances in technology have changed the way people live and gain information. Technology in this era continues to revolutionize teaching practices and management in schools. It is therefore a challenge for schools in the 21st century to make themselves ready for the demands of the times.

This paper describes the efforts of San Isidro National High School to raise the level of information and communication technology (ICT) use in the school.

San Isidro National High School, a public educational institution located in the gateway of Makati, has always believed in providing the best education to the Filipino youth in order to enable them to be productive citizens. Since 2004, the school has taken steps to improve its management and pedagogical practices. These initiatives encompass infrastructure building, curriculum design, data management, faculty professional development, and student development. All these initiatives are anchored on the vision and mission of the school.

The school is envisioned to be the prime center for development, communication, and technology in Makati. Its mission is to provide an ICT-enabled learning environment geared towards the development of learners as critical thinkers, effective communicators, skillful individuals, and morally upright members of society. The attainment of this vision has been plotted in a 5-year strategic plan for ICT, which was drafted through the concerted efforts of the school administrators, faculty, students, parents, and other stakeholders.

Finally, the school hopes to measure quantitatively and qualitatively the impact of ICT-related programs and projects through a range of assessment strategies. A monitoring and evaluation system has been devised to check on both progress and outcomes.
   
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The Integration of Technologies in the Classroom Program
of Placido del Mundo Elementary School:
Gateway to pupils’ learning success

by Joseph Acio
Principal, Placido del Mundo Elementary School, Schools Division of Quezon City
National Capital Region, Department of Education


Placido del Mundo Elementary School, in its quest to enable its learners to be highly competitive in a high-tech world, piloted the Integration of Technologies in the Classroom (ITC) Program in two classes each from Grades I to VI. Following a Station Rotation Approach, children were grouped and then asked to perform learning tasks at different stations over a one-week period. These tasks required them to work with a variety of technology-based materials.
This paper discusses the Station Rotation Approach adopted and the impact of this new methodology on the pupil learning. It argues that the most important elements of successful technology integration are appropriate hardware and software, a technology literate staff, and curriculum-driven technology use.

This paper then describes the challenges encountered by the school as it endeavored to institutionalize the ITC program. Faced with the prospect of upgrading and purchasing new equipment, the school was thrown into an arena full of clashing operating systems, developing uncertainties, and software turmoil. However, with the support of parents, PTCA officers, school officials, and partner non-government organizations, problems were solved and the program continues to the present.

The breadth of the success of Placido del Mundo Elementary School’s ITC Program is a result of a unique teaching philosophy: Pupils of all ages learn best in an interactive, creative environment that enables them to explore, challenge, and discover. With the ITC Program, pupils at Placido del Mundo Elementary School are continuously engaged in a variety of activities that stimulate their desire to become active constructors of knowledge.
   
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Schools Radio Broadcasting: 97.9 SJ FM La Salle Radio
by Emily D. Bondad
Head, External Affairs Office, St. Joseph School - La Salle, Bacolod City

97.9 SJ FM La Salle Radio is a licensed FM radio station of St. Joseph School – La Salle, which can be heard in Barangay Villamonte, Bacolod City, Negros Occidental from 7:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on school days. Programming includes a wide range of music shows, public affairs programs, and curriculum-relevant segments.

Schools radio broadcasting is an innovative way to learn about many subjects across the curriculum. Thus, La Salle Radio Program’s primary focus is to encourage teachers to incorporate radio into curricular and extra-curricular activities. The goal is not to ask teachers to do something extra, but rather to offer them tools that will help them to do more effectively, through the medium of radio, what they are already doing.

This paper gives an overview of the La Salle Radio Program, its infrastructure and technical operations, content and programming, management structure and financing arrangements. This paper discusses the benefits that have redounded to the school and the community as a result of the program, and the issues and challenges to program sustainability.
   
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Distance Education for the Marginalized:
Using communication technology as an alternative approach to adult literacy education

by Jose S. Cruz III
Director, Office for Community Development, University of Santo Tomas

The University of Santo Tomas Distance Education for the Marginalized Program is an adult distance literacy education program that uses two-way radio (broadcast) as the medium of delivery. From an initial pilot class of 15 Aeta and “unat” women in Sitio Malasa four years ago, the program is now being implemented in four indigenous peoples’ communities in Bamban, Tarlac. There are now close to 120 enlisted learners in eight “sections” in four communities, supported by eight trained local para-teachers.

This paper describes the experience of the University in developing and managing this program. It identifies the requisites for successful implementation, assesses the impact on learners and their community, and discusses the main challenges faced and how these were overcome. This paper concludes with some general recommendations on how ICTs can be harnessed to address the problem of unequal access to education services.
   
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21st Century Lifeskills for the Poor:
The Sandiwaan experience

by Rev. Fr. Benigno P. Beltran, SVD
Executive Director, Sandiwaan Center for Learning

Among the many problems facing the country at present, the deterioration of the Philippine educational system, once a model for the Asian region, is the most serious. A potentially explosive effect of this problem is the large number of young people leaving school. Only four out of ten youths who start elementary school get to finish high school. Estimates of the number of out-of-school youths range from seven to nine million.

The Sandiwaan Center for Learning (SCL), a local non-government organization (NGO) serving families in the Smokey Mountain area in Tondo, Manila who make a living out of scavenging in the biggest garbage dump in the world, initiated a program with the Department of Education Bureau of Alternative Learning Systems (BALS) to give out-of-school youths and even adults a chance to complete their high school education. The first classes used printed booklets and traditional classroom-style sessions, with limited success. The SCL later received used computers with some basic skills learning software and put them in the classrooms. The students started attending classes more regularly and were able to finish their lessons. Half of the students were able to pass the equivalency tests for their high school diploma. With startup funding from foreign foundations, and partnering with a number of local NGOs, SCL’s e-Learning Project has now a core staff of content experts working with graphic artists and multimedia specialists to produce CDs and DVDs of learning modules in English, Math, Science, and Makabayan (Social Studies).

This paper discusses the experience of SCL in designing and implementing an eLearning model for out-of-school youths, the constraints and challenges it faced, and the prospects for future action.
   
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Developing Localized ICT-enabled Content for e-Health:
The Molave WASH experience

by Angelo Juan O. Ramos, MD, MPH
Executive Director, Molave Development Foundation, Inc.

This paper describes the experience of the Molave Development Foundation in developing and deploying ICT-enabled content for teaching and learning about water, hygiene, and sanitation (WASH) issues in a non-formal education setting. With funding from the International Development Research Center of Canada, Molave Development Foundation worked with two communities, one in an urban slum area and another in a rural barangay, to develop content for e-Health.

This paper discusses the bottom-up, community-based participatory approach to content development employed, and identifies the issues and problems encountered during the conceptualization, beta-testing, and implementation phases. Results of a study conducted to determine the relative impact of using ICT-enabled content on the knowledge, skills, and behavior of students with regard to proper hygiene and sanitation compared to using traditional paper-based modules are also presented. Finally, lessons learned from the experience and recommendations for future implementation are presented.
   
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Designing and Implementing
an Effective Teacher Professional Development Program
on ICT Integration: A framework for decision-making

by Maria Cristina Robles
Education Supervisor I, Schools Division of Malabon and Navotas
National Capital Region, Department of Education


Twenty-first century educators are exploring new paradigms of teaching and learning in ensuring that technology is used effectively to create new opportunities for learning and to promote student achievement. However, the infusion of information and communication technology (ICT) into the curriculum requires that educators find appropriate ways to integrate ICT into the core curriculum, align it with student learning goals, and use it for engaged learning activities. Thus, professional development for teachers becomes the key issue in using technology to improve the quality of learning in the classroom.

This paper examines teacher development for the integration of ICT in terms of both pre-service teacher education and continuing professional development. The first part of this paper discusses issues and trends in teacher professional development and ICTs. The second part describes current models and approaches to pre-service teacher education and continuing professional development that address ICT integration. The third part identifies a number of key characteristics or ingredients associated with successful ICT teacher professional development drawn from both professional development initiatives and models from different parts of the world and from current research literature. Part four identifies barriers and critical success factors for effective teacher learning. Part five presents a framework for exemplary practice selection based on a synthesis of the professional development initiatives and models described in this paper and on current research literature. To conclude, this paper offers recommendations that flow from the analysis of effective models and measures of effectiveness of teacher professional development programs discussed.
   
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Developing a Technology-distributed
Teacher Professional Development Program:
Framework, issues and challenges

by Nemah N. Hermosa
Dean, Faculty of Education, University of the Philippines Open University

New communication technologies make it possible for teachers to participate in larger, geographically dispersed professional communities beyond the boundaries of the classroom, the school, and the local district. These technologies enable teachers to collaborate with each other at a distance in order to build new knowledge, learn about new resources, and develop new strategies to enhance teaching. Yet the effectiveness of technology-distributed programs does not hinge on developing cost-effective technology solutions and ensuring accessibility alone. This paper discusses the framework for, as well as the broad range of issues, challenges, and demands involved in developing an effective technology-distributed program for teacher professional development.
   
 
 

ICT and Teacher Training: Case studies from across the world
by Tim Unwin
Professor, Department of Geography, Royal Holloway, University of London

The central purpose of this paper is to present the findings of recent research and program implementation on the use of information and communications technology (ICT) in teacher training from diverse countries across the world. Drawing on this, it highlights key policy implications for those wishing to implement such programs in the future.

This paper begins with an overview of the more important challenges facing those interested in using ICT to enhance teacher training programs, noting in particular the high cost of such initiatives, the value that distance education can nevertheless provide, and the need to focus on how best to use ICT to support learning objectives rather than as an end in itself. It then notes that there are many existing frameworks for such activities, notably the work of the Society for IT in Education and the UNESCO framework published in 2002. Two African case studies are illustrated: the DEEPER program run by the United Kingdom’s Open University and Fort Hare University in South Africa, which introduced the use of personal digital assistants to enhance teacher performance; and the Imfundo initiative set up by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (UK) in 2001 to support ICT education initiatives across the continent, emphasizing in particular the value of partnerships. This is followed by the examples of the European Union (EU) Gansu Basic Education Support Program, emphasizing the appropriate use of new technologies in rural areas; the Jordan Education Initiative, highlighting the role of the private sector; the UK’s experiences, focusing especially on integrating teachers within a wider program of ICT-based educational reform; and the experiences of Singapore, focusing especially on the need for substantial support and training in the use of basic ICT resources.

In conclusion, this paper emphasizes the desirability of ensuring that the following eight success principles are in place before such programs are initiated in the future: the existence of an integrated national plan for the use of ICT in education; the involvement of all stakeholders, and especially teachers, in the preparation of the program; a combination of in-service and pre-service training; the provision of sufficient technical support; the need to draw on existing examples of success while ensuring that these are tailored to local conditions; the need for cross-sectoral partnerships to help ensure sustainability; the existence of links to wider schemes of teacher professional development and rewards; and the importance of comprehensive monitoring and evaluation.
   
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Mindanao eLearning Space Quality Management System:
An effective approach to eLearning

by Gilbert Importante, Danilo Galarion, Gladys Florangel Ortiz,
and Ansylm Condrad Gamalong

Mindanao eLearning Space,
Philippines–Australia Basic Education Assistance for Mindanao Project


The greater demands placed on business by customers and by the forces of globalization and information and communication technology combined with increasing dissatisfaction with traditional command and control management paradigms demand greater flexibility and adaptability through continuous organizational learning (Creech 1994, Denton 1998, Juran 1979). Drucker (1993) contends that a fundamental challenge for organizations is to build systematic practices for managing self-transformation. These include continuing improvement in every activity, development of new applications from its own success, and continuous innovation in an organized process. Thus, there is a recognized need for organizations to continually improve and accelerate learning and knowledge creation so that they can compete effectively in a constantly changing operating environment.

This paper examines how the Mindanao eLearning Space consortium has developed and implemented a quality management system (QMS) to support continuous improvement in meeting the learning needs of the Department of Education. It begins by providing a brief background on the establishment of Mindanao eLearning Space and the impetus for change. A review of literature on quality, continuous improvement, and organizational change follows, which serves as the underpinning rationale for the quality approach taken to the instructional design of eLearning products. Discussion of the instructional design process also analyzes how the QMS has been structured at each step to maximize learning and enhance the outcomes of eLearning products.
   
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The Pilot Intel® Teach to the Future Pedagogical Support System
by Monalisa M. Te-Sasing and Celia R. Balbin
Information Science Group, University of the Philippines National Institute
for Science and Mathematics Education Development


The Intel® Teach to the Future Program has already trained more than 50,000 high school teachers on how to effectively integrate technology in the subjects they teach. Although end-of-training evaluations consistently show that a high percentage of teachers greatly appreciated the new strategies and skills they learned, an impact survey conducted in 2003 reported poor utilization of said strategies and skills in the classroom as evidenced by the very low percentage of teachers actually implementing the technology-enhanced Unit Plan developed during training. Among the reasons cited by teachers was the lack of adequate technical and/or instructional support.

Cognizant of the crucial role of post-training support in maximizing impact at the school level, the program piloted the Intel Teach to the Future Pedagogical Support System (PSS) in school year 2005-2006. The PSS was set up to provide instructional support to 68 teachers trained in May 2005 to enable them to implement a technology-enhanced Unit Plan and overcome challenges during implementation. The support provided consisted of an array of activities, resources, and services carried out in three stages, namely, Stage 1: Unit Plan Enhancement, Stage 2: Unit Plan Implementation, and Stage 3: Reflection and Evaluation.

This paper describes the structure, processes, personnel, and tools comprising the pilot Pedagogical Support System that enabled 97% of the teachers to fully and successfully implement their Unit Plans. It then discusses the challenges encountered by the teachers and support providers as well as the learnings derived from the pilot implementation. It concludes with a discussion of implications for curriculum delivery and supervision, planning, and administrative support.
   
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Techmentoring: The Partners in Learning way
by Sherlita L. Daguisonan
ICT Coordinator, Iligan City East High School – Hinaplanon
Schools Division of Iligan City, Region X, Department of Education

and Manuel O. Caberte
ICT Coordinator, Bayugan National Comprehensive High School
Schools Division of Agusan del Sur, CARAGA Region, Department of Education


Technology has the potential to open the classroom to a greater world of learning and experience. Teachers are challenged to prepare their students for a technology-driven environment and to innovatively make technology a part of their teaching tools. Helping the country’s educators teach technology and teach with technology is Microsoft’s Partners in Learning (PiL) initiative.

This paper describes the experience of the authors as part of a core group of 40 public high school teachers trained as PiL “techmentors” in 2005 to provide instructional support for technology and curriculum integration to peers (called “mentees”) in their respective schools, divisions, and regions. It shows how they and their mentees undertook learning from each other in order to realize the educational potential of technology. Specifically, this paper focuses on the following questions:
  1. How did the authors get started as techmentors?
  2. What kind of support do techmentors provide mentees?
  3. What aspects of techmentoring do mentees find most helpful?
  4. How does techmentoring affect the mentees?
  5. What are the effects of techmentoring on student attitude and performance in class?
  6. What are the challenges to successful techmentoring?
   
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Using Radio to Deliver Instruction:
UP NISMED’s Titser’s Iskul on the Air Program

by Ester A. Bautista
Audio Visual Group, University of the Philippines National Institute
for Science and Mathematics Education Development


This paper discusses the experience of the University of the Philippines National Institute for Science and Mathematics Education Development (UP NISMED) in using radio to deliver instruction in science and mathematics. It describes how the radio’s versatile features and its wider reach were used to effectively provide non-formal education services to in-service teachers and the general public. Highlights of a recently conducted course, Titser’s Iskul on the Air: Third Course, are presented to concretize the strategies used to teach basic mathematics concepts via radio. This paper also presents partial results of evaluations conducted, noting the merits of the radio course as well as the areas for further improvement. The learnings gained from UP NISMED’s experience can be useful inputs to implementers of similar programs and to education planners interested in exploiting the potential of radio as a distance education medium.
   
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Soaring High: The ICT in education experience of MSU-IIT
by Sonia M. Alensub
AV Media Coordinator, College of Education
Mindanao State University - Iligan Institute of Technology


In 2004, the College of Education (CED) of Mindanao State University - Iligan Institute of Technology (MSU-IIT) became an implementing university of the Intel® Teach to the Future Training Program. Thus began its information and communication technology (ICT) in education journey. By the first semester of academic year 2005-2006, there were already 11 faculty members integrating the Intel® Teach Pre-service curriculum in courses such as Educational Technology, Principles and Methods of Teaching, Multimedia Applications in Teaching, and in the various Strategies courses.

Following initial successes, CED’s ICT training team geared up for more involvement in ICT in education. Besides pursuing the goal of becoming a regional training university of Intel® Teach, its members worked hard also for the College to be a teacher education institution for Microsoft’s No Teacher Left Behind project and for FIT-ED’s World Links Philippines project.

This paper outlines the history of technology-curriculum integration at CED. It discusses the strategies CED employed and identifies success factors and “best” practices.
   
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  PDF File (Appendix A. ICT4E Special Program)
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ICT Integration: A roadmap for Philippine educational institutions
by Lloyd D. Espiritu
Associate Professor, Instructional Systems Technology Program
College of Computer Studies, De La Salle University


The effective use of information and communication technology (ICT) is a must for creating world-class educational institutions and globally competitive workforce. The roadmap proposed in this paper is a multi-stage, multi-user approach aimed at guiding educational institutions to acquire and develop the appropriate info-structure (information infrastructure) and competencies (knowledge and skills) for optimizing the use of technology by school administrators and staff, teachers, and students. The roadmap is accomplished through an ICT integration methodology that involves systematic planning, implementation, training, and evaluation of every aspect of the technologies to be used.
   
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Information Fluency Continuum
by Fr. Jose Marie Legaspi
President, Learn.ph Foundation

Raising children who are technology savvy is becoming more and more a non-issue in academic dialogue or conversations. We live in a world where technology is so pervasive it is embedded in practically every aspect of human activity. Yet to be successful in a knowledge-based society where information is ubiquitous requires more than just technology literacy. While technology literacy provides the basic platform to navigate through a plethora of information, information fluency is the critical building block of knowledge construction in the 21st Century.

Information fluency encompasses a range of competencies that enable an individual to effectively use appropriate information and communication technologies (ICTs) to access, analyze, critique, and synthesize information, solve problems, communicate ideas in multiple formats to a variety of audiences, and create new knowledge.

The Information Fluency Continuum discussed in this paper is a proposed framework for ICT-related student competencies at the primary and secondary levels. Levels of information fluency are defined by specific competencies with corresponding performance indicators. In addition, this Continuum provides educators with a reference point for seamlessly aligning information fluency competencies with specific subject area competencies in a given learning activity.
   
 
 

Online Learning and Intellectual Property Rights: An overview
by Atty. Adrian S. Cristobal, Jr.
Director General, IP Philippines

Today, technology has provided virtually unlimited access to knowledge and information to anyone with a computer and Internet access. This presentation discusses the challenges facing online learning or education, specifically in dealing with the intellectual property rights (IPRs) of authors vis-à-vis the need to disseminate knowledge and information. This presentation also discusses the legal issues surrounding IPRs on the Internet, particularly those affecting online learning and education, and some of the measures being taken to address these issues.
   
 
 

FOSS in Education Strategy
by John Macasio
Consultant, Human Capital Development Group
Commission on Information and Communications Technology


People normally associate free and open source software (FOSS) with Linux. But it should be noted that FOSS goes beyond the mere use of Linux. Rather, it is an advocacy to make the development of technology solutions a “project” openly and freely supported by a global community of developers and users. It encourages free distribution of software products along with their corresponding documentations so that the codes can be freely studied and modified for feature enhancement and localization.

FOSS covers information and communications technology (ICT) projects on operating systems, network services, databases, programming tools, office productivity, communication and collaboration, multimedia tools, educational systems, business solutions, project management tools, and user’s manuals. Most of the stable projects have become part of the enterprise ICT infrastructure to implement web-based business applications, integrated data systems, content management, and enterprise collaboration. Mainstream FOSS developments are being managed by the best and most respected innovators in the software development world who have greatly contributed to the evolution of best practices and standards in the ICT sector.

In essence, FOSS provides the licensing framework to use, share, and modify freely software and documentations – something that the education sector needs to exploit in its instructional strategy.

This paper presents a strategic framework for the education sector to invest in free and open source solutions to enhance curriculum, to support instructional delivery, and to build the corresponding ICT service infrastructure. It calls for the education sector to seriously consider and incorporate free and open source solutions into its ICT services portfolio, aligning these with the business and instructional ends of education. This paper then reviews the free and open source projects that offer the “no lock-in” environment necessary to build generic ICT competencies and to promote productivity among education practitioners. Finally, it articulates the significance of open source licensing and project collaboration in propelling the education sector to contribute globally and locally to the maturation and implementation of “open standards” and “technology solutions for all”.
   
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GILAS: Connecting our youth to the World Wide Web
by Oscar Sañez
Director, GILAS, Ayala Foundation, Inc.

Internet literacy has become an imperative today. Companies have raised the bar for new hires, requiring proof of Internet literacy as part of the minimum qualifications for employment. The Filipino youth suffer the risk of being ill equipped in a world that is increasingly digital. However, since the Philippine Government remains heavily burdened by the task of improving on even more basic resource shortages in the public education system, this problem is not yet urgently addressed.

Nonetheless, the inadequacy of resources in the system should not be cause to separate the Filipino youth from the wealth of knowledge and opportunities that the Internet offers. Before the project “Gearing Up Internet Literacy Access for Students” (GILAS) was launched, only about 308 (below 6%) of the country’s public high schools had facilities that give students training for and access to the Internet. GILAS was started in 2005, aiming to provide Internet connectivity to all 5,789 public high schools in 5 years. Since then students from 875 public high schools now enjoy Internet access.

This paper highlights the educational benefits of connectivity and reflects on the technical, pedagogical, organizational, and financial challenges of connecting Philippine public high schools. The issue of sustainability is likewise addressed. The work of GILAS in the Schools Division of Quezon City is presented as an example of multi-sectoral engagement for sustainable ICT use in basic education.
   
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Making Information Technology Safe
for Children and Young People Wherever They Are

by Josefina Encenso-Alforque
Advocacy Officer, ECPAT Philippines

Violence against children and young people committed via new technologies, and in particular, the Internet, is a new phenomenon that has spread across diverse societies around the world in recent years. The scale of violence against children in virtual space is closely related to the rapid expansion of information and communication technologies (ICTs).

Production, distribution, and use of materials depicting child sexual abuse; online solicitation or ‘grooming’ of children; exposure to materials that can cause psychological harm, lead to physical harm, or facilitate other detriment to a child, including online harassment, intimidation, and bullying – these are some of the types of online violence. A child may also witness extreme violence or be exposed to harmful content through online games and in online shops selling materials such as weapons and drugs.

Children and young people at risk include those who currently use ICTs and those who will do so in the future. Even those who do not have access to the latest communications devices may be subjects of photos that are sent into cyberspace or advertised online as commodities. All children may be at risk when they go online anywhere – at home, in school, and in Internet shops.

This paper describes the various threats to which children and young people are exposed online and discusses a range of existing technologies and strategies that may be used to make the Internet a safer place for everyone.
 
 

Managing Your ICT Laboratory: Systems and procedures
by Roy V. Zapata
Business Manager, Center for Industrial Technology and Enterprise

Preparing the ICT laboratory manager for the school’s computer network for teaching and learning does not only involve training him or her in computer and network maintenance. If the ICT center is to work for many years, recouping – in terms of effective and efficient use by students, teachers, and the community – investments made in facilities and operations, then systems and procedures that all the users must follow strictly must be put in place.

AUPs and SOPs may seem like an alphabet soup but they spell the difference between efficiency and wastefulness. CITE’s years of experience with private and public schools in designing and installing ICT laboratories show that systems and procedures are essential aspects of successful school ICT facility projects. Thus, one of the key components in CITE’s projects is to help lab managers carefully design and install systems and procedures that are appropriate to their particular situation.

Appropriate Use Policies or AUPs are broad policies that apply to workstations as well as to the local area network and the Internet. Standard Operating Procedures or SOPs refer to the collection of common, clearly defined steps that must be followed when running the laboratory. AUPs and SOPs, when adhered to strictly, prevent or reduce risk or damage to both equipment and users, promote more efficient use of resources, and make the job of the lab manager more practicable.

This presentation will go through the process of developing a simple AUP and SOP that can serve as template for lab managers who plan to develop and enforce systems and procedures in their own schools.
   
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Involving Communities for Better Education:
The case of Tayud, Consolacion

by Luchi C. Flores
Executive Director, Coalition for Better Education/Center for Teacher Excellence

Involving Communities for Better Education or iNCUBE, a project developed and implemented by the Coalition for Better Education, seeks to improve the quality of education by providing “critical inputs” identified by the Department of Education as necessary for effective classroom learning. One such input provided is curriculum development, with a particular focus on integrating information and communication technologies into curricula and/or enhancing existing curricula to highlight “living values”.

This paper describes the “edu-system” approach of iNCUBE, which involves the twinning of interventions at the school/classroom level with interventions at the community level in order to increase the participation of various local education stakeholders in the development of school programs and plans of action. This in turn enhances the relevance of school reforms and improves prospects for sustainability. The educational and social impact of iNCUBE is likewise discussed. This paper concludes with a discussion of key strategies for improving community participation in education.
   
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“Broadbanding” Education - The Smart way
by Ramon R. Isberto
Public Affairs Group Head, Smart Communications, Inc.

The experience of the Smart Schools Program demonstrates that “broadbanding” education requires not only the provision of improved communications technologies but also more sustained efforts to raise the capabilities of teachers via trainings and the provision of venues for collaboration.

Launched in December 2004, the Smart Schools Program started out with the aim of connecting public high schools to the Internet. Using its wireless broadband service, Smart has been able to rapidly provide connectivity to its public high school partners, even in areas without fixed line connections. After its pilot phase, however, it became clear that it was not enough to provide connectivity. A robust teacher training program was needed to ensure that the provision of Internet access would produce lasting gains in terms of improved teacher and student performance.

This presentation discusses how the Smart Schools Program developed a training-led deployment strategy to ensure that teachers and schools are properly prepared to absorb the new technologies. Smart initially engaged various partners—the Philippine Business for Social Progress, Microsoft Philippines Partners in Learning, and sister companies within the PLDT group—for implementation and training. To further consolidate its training thrust, Smart also tapped as training hubs its network of over 40 colleges and universities nationwide under the Smart Wireless Engineering Education Program. As a result, over 3,000 public high school teachers have been trained, and now these teachers are mentoring their peers. Through this innovative strategy, the Smart Schools Program has developed greater and more cost-effective training capacity. It has also encouraged greater participation of partner schools in the program’s growing online community and a stronger commitment to sustaining the program beyond the initial one-year connectivity grant, with some partners now utilizing their computer laboratories as training centers and community e-centers.
   
 
 

Mobilizing Island Communities to Sustain Television-based Instruction: The Knowledge Channel experience in Mindanao
by Doris Nuval
Project Director, TEAM-Mindanao, Knowledge Channel Foundation, Inc.

The Knowledge Channel Foundation, Inc.’s project called Television Education for the Advancement of Muslim Mindanao (TEAM-Mindanao) is a 3-year (2005-2007) USAID-assisted program meant to equip 150 public schools in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao, Region IX, and Region XII with educational television. Dedicated access to the Knowledge Channel is provided to selected public elementary and high schools by installing satellite dishes, digital receivers, and 29” TV sets in the neediest and most remote sites in Muslim Mindanao. This communications technology-based educational intervention seeks to improve the academic performance of students in Math, Science, and English; and correspondingly, to increase the beneficiary schools’ achievement levels in the same subject areas in national examinations.

This paper discusses the TEAM-Mindanao model, highlighting community ownership and participation as a prerequisite of sustainability. This paper concludes with some recommendations for improving the model.
   
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Private Sector-Public Sector Partnerships
on ICT-related Services: The STI On-the-Job Training Program

by Sherrie B. Garcia
Curriculum and Courseware Manager, Academics Division, STI Headquarters

Funding has long been a source of bottlenecks in pushing, supporting, or maintaining education innovations in the school, particularly in the public sector. This difficulty in sourcing financial support has exacerbated our public schools’ struggle for competitiveness not only in keeping up with the ever growing population of student enrollees, but more so in introducing much needed education innovations to ensure that our students have the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the demands of today’s workplace.

With this in mind, STI has entered into partnerships with several educational institutions, both public and private, on ICT-related services through an On-the-Job Training (OJT) Program. This paper shares the experience of STI in building these partnerships and provides insights on the relevance and implications of such partnerships. STI Alaminos and STI Santiago are presented as illustrative cases.
   
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Financing ICTs in Basic Education
by Maria Victoria D. Abcede
Chair, ICT Technical Committee, Department of Education

While the bulk of the investment requirements for the development, deployment, and operation of information and communication technologies (ICTs) programs and projects comes from the annual budgetary appropriations of the National Government, an intensified resource mobilization scheme involving all stakeholders in basic education is being pursued by the Department of Education to defray the total cost of ownership of ICT-supported initiatives.

This paper presents good practice models in financing ICTs in basic education. More particularly, it provides insights on tapping the resources of local government units through the Special Education Fund for greater and more efficient investment in ICT-based initiatives that meet locally defined strategic goals. This paper also highlights experiences and lessons learned in securing donations and contributions from other government agencies, international development organizations, and the private sector, and in mobilizing the financial support of Parent-Teacher-Community Associations, non-government organizations, and local industry for ICT-based programs and projects.
   
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Surfing Under the Sun: A sustainable computer laboratory-Internet café at Cabilao National High School
by Mario L. Garcia
Principal, Cabilao National High School, Schools Division of Bohol Province
Region VII, Department of Education


Cabilao, a roughly eight square kilometer island between Cebu and Bohol, is one of the most popular dive spots in the Visayan seas. While most of the 3,500 Cabilao residents survive by fishing or farming, the island also hosts three beach and dive resorts, which cater to mostly foreign tourists and which contribute significantly to the local economy.

Because of Cabilao’s isolated location, basic services such as power and water are not readily available on the island. The community operates a gasoline-powered generator that supplies residents with electricity, but for only four hours in the evening. Despite these constraints, DED (German Development Service) and GTZ (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit), in partnership with the local government and the Center for Industrial Technology and Enterprise, envisioned providing the 450 students of Cabilao National High School (CNHS) with the same learning opportunities enabled by information and communication technologies that are available to their peers in less remote and better resourced communities. In 2004, six computers running on solar power were installed at CNHS and Internet access was provided via satellite.

This presentation gives an overview of the project, noting its technical and organizational features, the curriculum-based teaching and learning activities organized, and the benefits to students and the rest of the community derived from the project. It then focuses on the Internet Café model developed by the school and the community to ensure the financial sustainability of the project, noting in particular the ownership and management structure, pricing and marketing strategy, partnerships, and financial management. A cost-revenue analysis is also provided. Finally, key issues, challenges, and success factors are highlighted.
   
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IBM eMentor Scholarship Program in Mindanao:
Strategic partnerships for effective ICT use in education

by Teresita P. Medado
General Manager, EduQuest, Inc.
Presented on the author’s behalf by Adelina Calub
Academic and Professional Development Services Manager, EduQuest, Inc.


Mindanao is known to have enormous economic potential, yet is one of the most underprivileged areas in the Philippines. Armed conflict and government negligence have hampered the development of the region. But despite geographic and economic limitations, communities in Mindanao are striving to reform their schools while maintaining their rich cultural heritage.

The IBM eMentor Scholarship Program has identified the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) as among its beneficiaries, specifically the provinces of Lanao del Norte, Lanao del Sur, Maguindanao, Sulu, Tawi-Tawi, and Basilan. The program is a collaborative effort of IBM Philippines EduQuest, Inc., the USAID-funded Growth with Equity in Mindanao (GEM-2) Project, Mindanao State University, the ARMM local government, and the Department of Education - ARMM. This strategic partnership has become the driving force in introducing new ICT-enabled teaching and learning practices in 22 high schools in ARMM. By pooling together their expertise and resources, partner institutions have succeeded in guiding these schools to adopt new practices that have had not only considerable educational impact but have also fostered socio-cultural change within the indigenous communities to which the schools belong.

This paper presents the IBM eMentor Scholarship Program as a benchmark for the smooth transition of schools towards meaningful ICT enablement and modernization, highlighting the role of strategic partnerships in furthering effective ICT use in education.
   
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The Negros Oriental High School e-Learning Club:
Organizing students in support of ICT–based innovations

by Myrna E. Sun, Coca-Cola ed.Venture Center Manager
and Kathleen S. Lasola, e-Learning Club Overall and Second Year Level Coordinator
Negros Oriental High School, Schools Division of Dumaguete City
Region VII, Department of Education


Negros Oriental High School (NOHS) is one of the biggest high schools in the province of Negros Oriental, with a student population of over 4,000 and a teacher population of over 100. The school was also fortunate enough to receive support from various organizations in order to set up two computer laboratories (one with 35 computers and another with 16 computers) to serve the needs of students not only for computer literacy training but also in subject-specific learning.

In 2003, the Coca-Cola ed.Venture Program initiated the formation of an e-Learning Club (eLC) in the school. Ten students each from the first to fourth year levels were organized to serve as teacher assistants and peer coaches for ICT integration activities in the classroom. Three years later, the eLC continues to renew and strengthen its membership and activities.

This paper presents an overview of the eLC and its activities. It then looks at the issues and concerns faced by the teachers and their students in the course of organizing and managing the eLC. Lastly, this paper makes recommendations on how to organize and sustain student support for ICT-based innovations.
   
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Students as Catalysts of ICT Integration:
The Dynamic Mathematicians Group at the University of the East (Caloocan) High School

by Jerrylin Cuenca
Adviser, Dynamic Mathematicians Group, University of the East (Caloocan) High School

To take advantage of the potential of technology use in boosting students’ interest in mathematics, especially in geometry, and to answer the call for innovations in teaching and learning math, high school teachers and students at the University of the East (Caloocan) organized D’Math Group (Dynamic Mathematics Group), an officially recognized student organization under the Math Club umbrella.

D’Math was established to help students extend their understanding of the concepts in geometry with the use of Geometer’s Sketchpad, improve their critical and creative thinking skills, and develop strategies for solving not only mathematical problems but real world problems as well. Geometer’s Sketchpad is a software application designed to allow users to “draw” geometric figures and mathematical diagrams using virtual versions of the compass, the straightedge, and other standard mathematical tools (Jones, 2002).

This paper outlines the rationale for establishing D’Math Group, its process of formation, organizational structure, membership, and program of activities. It then discusses the impact the club has had on both members and non-members, highlighting the role of the club in catalyzing ICT integration in the school as a whole. This paper concludes with a discussion of the issues and challenges faced by the club in initiating and sustaining its activities, and the factors that have contributed to its success.
   
 
 

Data-driven Information and Communication Technology
Planning for Schools, Divisions, and Regions

by Ma. Mercedes T. Rodrigo
Associate Professor, Department of Information Systems and Computer Science
Ateneo de Manila University


Data-driven decision-making refers to the gathering of information to guide educational planning. In 2005, the Foundation for Information Technology Education and Development (FIT-ED), in cooperation with the Department of Education (DepEd), provided technical assistance to schools, divisions, and regions on information and communication technology (ICT) planning. A fundamental part of this planning process was the conduct of an environmental scan.

The objective of environmental scanning is to gather baseline information on basic utilities, ICT facilities, extent of use of ICT facilities, personnel attitudes towards ICTs, personnel ICT skill levels, ICT needs and desired uses, and perceived obstacles to ICT use. Organizations then plan programs and projects that will take them from the baseline to a desired target state.

This paper explains the background and rationale behind environmental scanning, discusses the prescribed contents of an environmental scan, and explains the connection between the data gathered and analyzed and an organization’s subsequent ICT plans.
   
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Project LIFTS – Harnessing ICT to Serve the Region
by Larry Samala
Regional ICT Coordinator, Region IV-MIMAROPA, Department of Education

The geographical configuration of the islands in Region IV-MIMAROPA poses a big challenge to educational management. One has to deal with the diverse physical and cultural attributes of each of the provinces, not to mention the financial burden and physical stress involved in going from one island to another. This is the very reason why the Department of Education Region IV-MIMAROPA’s Project LIFTS (Learning Improvements for Teachers and Students) came into existence. Project LIFTS aims to:
  • create an alternative, efficient, and cost effective mode of service delivery;
  • reduce then eliminate the digital divide;
  • build the capacity of English, Science, and Mathematics teachers;
  • decentralize management of training;
  • develop teachers’ skills in producing technology-based instructional materials; and
  • foster communities of practice where everyone shares and learns in the experiences of others.

Twenty-five “learning stations” were identified and established across the region. These stations were the best equipped schools in the region as far as information and communication technology (ICT) is concerned. Twenty secondary and elementary teachers in each learning station were then tasked to be facilitators to teachers of satellite schools who would avail of the services offered by these stations.

This paper outlines the design and implementation of Project LIFTS, focusing on the key challenges encountered and the actions taken to overcome these challenges. Factors that contributed to project success are also identified, and implications for policy suggested.
   
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Project Online ECIJANOS:
Using digital imaging and video technology
to enhance instruction, administration, and documentation

by Ericson S. Sabacan
Education Supervisor I (ICT and Media), Schools Division of Nueva Ecija
Region III, Department of Education

Recognizing the need to make information and communication technology (ICT) widely accessible to students and teachers in the basic education system, considering the limited capacity of bringing ICT equipment to public schools, and understanding the value of modernization and technological advancement to an educational system, the Department of Education Schools Division of Nueva Ecija conceived of Project Online ECIJANOS. This project aims to:
  • introduce and apply basic digital technology in instruction, administration, and documentation;
  • equip teachers, administrators, and students with relevant skills and knowledge in basic digital imaging and video technology; and
  • prepare electronic and digital school profiles, documentaries, reports, and instructional materials to enhance teaching, learning, and administration.

This paper describes the activities and accomplishments of Project ECIJANOS to date, the impact the project has had on teachers, students, administrators, and members of the community, and the issues and challenges encountered during project implementation.
   
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Mobilizing Community Support for ICT-based Innovations
by Ariel C. Lansang
Education Supervisor I, Schools Division of Olongapo City
Region III, Department of Education


While the Department of Education has embarked on a massive campaign to institutionalize a new curriculum that embraces technology integration, the immediate communities where schools are located have had little active involvement in the assessment of educational technology needs and related concerns. This is especially true insofar as school improvement planning in general, and the development and implementation of information and communication technology (ICT) programs and projects in particular, are concerned.

This paper contends that parents and other members of the larger community should not be mere auxiliaries of the school. This means that the community must be a dynamic partner in promoting the use of ICT as a valuable tool for improving student competencies. This paper proposes a paradigm for mobilizing community support for ICT-based innovations that considers the dynamic between community, communication, and technology. Strategies for optimizing community support for ICT-based innovations, possible benefits, and potential risks are analyzed.
   
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Copyright © 2006 Foundation for Information Technology Education and Development, Inc (FIT-ED).

 
This website contains abstracts of all paper presentations and demonstrations, and the full papers and slide presentations submitted to the Congress organizers by 7 September 2006. Copyright to individual papers and presentations belongs to their respective authors. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in these papers and presentations are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Congress organizers.