Concurrent Demonstrations
 

Concurrent Demonstrations 1

 
  Scaffolding Learning
  Integrating Video Lessons in Instruction to Develop HOTS
  World Links “Our Village”:
Project-based Telecollaborative Learning
  iSchool WebBoard
  Concurrent Demonstrations 2
 
  Authentic Assessment Strategies
  BEAM Learning Guide System
  Intel® Teach to the Future Evaluation Methodology
  Moodle and Student-centered Learning
 

Scaffolding Learning
by Patricia B. Arinto
Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, University of the Philippines Open University

In education, the word scaffolding is used to refer to various forms of support given to assist, guide, or facilitate the learning process. Scaffolding is particularly important in helping students accomplish complex learning tasks. In technology-supported lessons, scaffolds can help “teachers and students to focus more on content than on the mechanics of technology use” (Fryer, 1999). Well scaffolded technology-supported lessons “point students to good resources and speed them toward insight” (McKenzie, 1998). In this session, examples of scaffolding for inquiry-based, computer-supported collaborative learning activities will be examined. These include guide questions, templates and forms, and graphic organizers such as concept maps, outlines, charts, and storyboards.
 
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Integrating Video Lessons in Instruction to Develop HOTS
by Evelyn L. Josue
Chair, Earth and Environmental Science Group
University of the Philippines National Institute
for Science and Mathematics Education Development (UP NISMED)


Research has shown that video is an appropriate media for teaching students, particularly those with low achievement, poor retention, behavioral problems, poor attendance, low socioeconomic status, and low literacy. However, showing a video to these students is only the first step. It’s true that video will attract their attention and make them receptive to learning. But once a video has caught their interest, the teacher should move on to one of the major objectives of teaching—to foster the development of higher order thinking skills (HOTS).

The Department of Education Bureau of Secondary Education and UP NISMED have developed a series of 14 video lessons using as context the Basic Education Curriculum for High School Science I (Integrated Science). Each video lesson is accompanied by a teacher’s guide, which describes curriculum entry points and the competencies addressed by the video; the contents of the video itself; recommended usage; the audio script; and a discussion guide. Strategies for using video lessons from this series to target HOTS will be explored.
 
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World Links “Our Village”:
Project-based Telecollaborative Learning

by Maria Lurenda Suplido Westergaard
Associate Professor, Faculty of Management and Development Studies
University of the Philippines Open University


In project-based learning, students create knowledge products in the process of investigating an issue or finding solutions to an open-ended problem. Students are encouraged to access and manage the information they gather, analyze this information, and make their own decisions. All these processes occur within a framework that veers away from the teacher-centered “lecture” approach, in a classroom atmosphere that tolerates experimentation, innovation, error, and changewhere students regularly reflect on what they are doing, and where evaluation takes place continuously. In addition, there is a final product (not necessarily material) that is produced and evaluated.

The Internet adds another dimension to project-based learning because not only does it allow unprecedented access to a wealth of information and educational resources, it also allows students and teachers to collaborate with distant peers. This paper discusses several potential benefits of “telecollaborative” learning projects, or those collaborative learning projects made possible through the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). It also describes the changes in the respective roles of the teacher and the student that occur when this type of learning project is conducted, and how the community can become more involved in the teaching and learning process.

One of the most challenging aspects of telecollaborative learning projects is instructional design. Many teachers have difficulty designing projects that are well-integrated into their curriculum, have defined means of assessment and evaluation, are acceptable to all participants, can be supported by existing technologies, and are not unduly burdensome to teachers and students in terms of time and resources. An ongoing national (and soon to be international) project called “Our Village”, developed and managed by the international non-government organization World Links, will be used to examine these and other issues related to the design, implementation, and assessment of telecollaborative projects.
 
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iSchool WebBoard
by John Macasio
Consultant, Human Capital Development Group
Commission on Information and Communications Technology


The iSchool WebBoard is a teacher-managed instructional website for e-learning. It provides teachers with a simple jumpstarting tool and methodology for integrating Internet resources into the teaching and learning process within the context of Department of Education (DepED)-defined learning competency standards. It contains an organized collection of instructional presentations, guided activities, reviewed references, and test materials that are openly published and updated by the teachers themselves under the copyright conditions of the Creative Commons License. These materials are intended for students to access before and after classroom instruction.

The iSchool WebBoard is a cooperative effort of the DepED Bureau of Secondary Education and the Human Capital Development Group of the Commission on Information and Communications Technology, with support from USAID’s Last Mile Initiative Philippines and Intel Philippines.

In this session, selected iSchool WebBoard content will be discussed and key functionalities of this online platform will be demonstrated.
 
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Authentic Assessment Strategies
by Hazel C. Acosta
Coordinator, Education Department, Social Science and Education Division
School of Arts and Sciences, Ateneo de Davao University


Traditional assessment methods that measure only what students have learned—and not why and how they have learned it—do not do justice to student learning in project- and inquiry-based computer-supported learning activities. Unlike traditional assessment, authentic assessment evaluates students’ abilities in real-world contexts, develops and measures multiple skills, and values the learning process as much as the finished product.

This session provides an overview of the forms of authentic assessment, namely: performance-based assessment, portfolio assessment, peer review and group feedback, and student self-assessment. Specific authentic assessment strategies under each form will be demonstrated.
 
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BEAM Learning Guide System
by Roger Saunders
Philippines – Australia Basic Education Assistance for Mindanao Project

The Basic Education Assistance for Mindanao (BEAM) Learning Guide System (LeGS) is an Internet-based platform for delivery of comprehensive teacher-resource and student activity materials that can also be modified for specific teacher needs. The system provides a controlled authoring, editing, and publishing environment that allows teachers to create and submit Learning Guides for publication, to be accessed and used by others. It also provides a database of materials that can be downloaded and printed locally.

In this session, existing Learning Guides will be cited and the following tools and functions of the LeGS platform will be explored: template documents that provide the structural and formatting standards for the Learning Guides; the use of the FreeMind Application to create a Mind Map of the Learning Guide; the On-line LeGS Editor; On-line Help; and the Administrator’s console. The discussion of these resources and tools will be framed by considerations of quality, curriculum-relevance, usability and adaptability, scalability, and sustainability.
 
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Intel® Teach to the Future Evaluation Methodology
by Daniel Light
Senior Researcher, Center for Children and Technology
Education Development Center


Effective evaluation should produce practice-based knowledge of how the information and communications technology (ICT) integration process can be designed to meet locally defined learning goals in education systems and combine this with research-based knowledge of what ICT applications work best in various educational environments to support program improvement and validation. Intel® Teach to the Future is one of very few international teacher professional development programs that supports evaluation of its own programs in the majority of countries where it is present in order to develop locally relevant programs. As one of the external evaluators for Intel® Teach programs, the Education Development Center (EDC) has been conducting evaluations in the United States for the past eight years and coordinating with many of the evaluators in other countries. In the U.S., EDC has provided formative feedback to program staff to inform program improvement and to look longitudinally at implementation issues and program impact. EDC has seen the program grow and change over time as the materials and implementation models have improved. This has given EDC ample opportunity to learn about the inherent complexity of designing evaluation models across diverse contexts.

The goal of this session is to discuss the design of effective evaluations and help audience participants address some of their own concerns in designing an evaluation. In this session, EDC will explain the design of the Intel® Teach evaluation strategies and review some of the evaluation instruments and protocols used. Using the experience of Intel® Teach, EDC will talk about how to decide upon appropriate research questions and how to identify pertinent indicators of success. The different advantages of quantitative and qualitative methods and the differences of formative and summative evaluation will also be discussed. The session will conclude with a brief discussion of how to use evaluation data to support program design and redesign to better accomplish overall program goals.
 
 

Moodle and Student-centered Learning
by Maria Lurenda Suplido Westergaard
Associate Professor, Faculty of Management and Development Studies
University of the Philippines Open University


Moodle is a free, open source course management system that a school can set up to facilitate the implementation of online activities. It can be used for a variety of purposes: presentation, drill and practice, interaction, and collaboration. It can also be used to facilitate administrative tasks related to teaching, such as student tracking, reporting learner progress or completion of tasks, and assessment.

It is important to remember, however, that to optimize teaching with technology requires skills in instructional design that would enable a teacher to exploit the array of available technological tools to achieve curricular goals. It is also important for teachers to recognize and embrace the paradigm shift that underpins the use of technology in education – that technology is used not merely to emulate or simulate conventional classroom practices but to create an environment for active, collaborative, and authentic learning.

In this session, the key features and functionalities of Moodle will be demonstrated in the context of student-centered instructional design.
 
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Copyright © 2006 Foundation for Information Technology Education and Development, Inc (FIT-ED).

 
This website contains abstracts of all paper presentations and demonstrations, and the full papers and slide presentations submitted to the Congress organizers by 7 September 2006. Copyright to individual papers and presentations belongs to their respective authors. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in these papers and presentations are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Congress organizers.